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Nail Mythbusters

One of the many things we do as nail technicians, amongst many many others, is we find ourselves having to convince our clients that we actually know what we are talking about! Am I right? Or having to convince them that Shellac is a name of gel polish and not a stand alone product.

 

So I would like to help you bust some myths! I have had a mully around the internet and a few forums and this is what I have found.

 

A great couple from www.salonfanatic.com by Teresa King:

  1. Storing nail polish in the fridge does not make it last longer!

Wow, so all those years of opening the fridge door to get the milk and all the little bottles of Rimel varnish that your mum put there fall out onto the floor. According to King: “All nail polish has a shelf-life (approximately one year) if it is stored in optimal conditions — at room temperature, away from direct sunlight. Putting it in the refrigerator causes it to crystallize and actually breaks down the formula, ruining it. Nail polish at room temperature is a must for polish to spread evenly on your nail.”

 

Teresa also suggests that:

  1. Cutting cuticles is a no-no!

Oooooh, here we go. So this seems to be the biggest debate that I have come across, to cut or not to cut – that is the question?

The nail artist from cityMANI goes onto say: “Not only is it illegal in NY state (and most other states), it exposes clients to bacterial infections such as staph, MRSA, etc. It also causes the skin to grow thicker, harder cuticle and eponychium because the living skin is being attacked and the body’s natural defense is to protect it.

Most people mistake the eponychium for the cuticle — eponychium is living skin, the cuticle is dead skin that has grown down onto the nail plate as the nail grows out (and should be removed ONLY with a cuticle removing solution and pushing back with a stick).”

At missu we teach people to only cut the cuticle and explain the nail structure thoroughly so as not to confuse the eponychium. However, this still remains a controversial grey area.

 

The third one that I am sure will shock you as much as me is this one from www.roserooms.co.uk that tells us this is a myth:

  1. Calcium is good for your nails

So apparently “No evidence currently exists that shows that ingesting calcium does anything positive for your nails, at all. Calcium is only found on the surface of the nail plate, and not in the deeper layers.”

Well then, I’m so glad of all that milk I was forced to drink, being told I would have lovely long nails and strong bones. *eye roll*

 

Rose Rooms are opening another can of worms with this one:

  1. UV nail lamps cause skin cancer

“Wrong. UV Nail lamps (includes LED) are safe. Several studies have been conducted by world experts that have demonstrated this. They have been shown to be at least 11 times safer than overhead sunlight and they produce less than 1/30th of the UV needed to redden the hands. Nail lamps are designed to be safe and only emit UV-A which is the safest part of the UV spectrum. NO UV-B or UV-C is used to cure nail coatings”

Yes, we know they don’t cause skin cancer. But hey, that is a discussion for another time – does eating tins of beans from the fridge cause stomach cancer? If everything they said causes cancer, did, then there isn’t much hope for any of us!

 

Moving on, this my favourite:

  1. Nails need to breathe

“No they don’t. The nail plate is not alive and does not have the ability to absorb air into the nail plate. Everything that the nail needs to grow and function comes from the bloodstream and not from the air.”

How many times has a client said, ‘I’m not going to have my mani this month, I’m going to let my nails breathe and grow’ So we begin to explain through gritted teeth…

 

OK, back up – check this one out:

  1. MMA is dangerous and it should not be used in artificial nails

“Amazingly this is false. MMA is not a dangerous product and is used around the world in dentistry, implanted in the body as bone cement and in contact lenses. However MMA nail products do not adhere very well to the nail plate so harsh filing is often used to try to ensure the enhancement sticks to the nail. MMA is also incredible strong making them difficult to break. This means that if the nail becomes caught or shut in a door the natural nail will more likely break than the enhancement which can lead to nail damage and could cause infection.

They are also notorious difficult to remove as they do not easily dissolve in acetone. This sadly means that more often than not they are pulled off of the nail causing more damage and thinning the nail plate in the process. So although not recommended as it is hard to apply and remove MMA is not dangerous.”

So, what they’re saying is MMA is not dangerous, it just is not suitable for nails. OK, same thing – NEXT!

 

I found a great thread on www.salongeek.com one member wants to know:

  1. Is gel better for your nails than acrylic?

Hmmm, great question. At one time, years ago in college, were we taught that gel suits some nail types and acrylics suit others? Maybe that was a dream.

My own test suggests that gel suits me better. The reason being, I have paper thin nails. I was so guilty of having a set of acrylics done as a one off then 2-3 weeks later, sat watching a film and I would nibble them all off! Cringe cringe, I know, please don’t hunt me down with pitchforks. But bad nail care has lead me to paper thin nails that won’t grow.

When I use acrylic I find the primer burns (even though it is acid free) then the enhancements feel tight and really just uncomfortable. Also acrylics just don’t last, they lift all the time no matter how much prep and priming has been done. So I made the switch to gel.

Thanks to our cool sculpting gel I get ZERO heat spike. They feel totally natural and I have never had one lift or some loose.

Score! So is it better? Answer is – what suits the client!

 

I’d love to hear your mythbusters!

 

 

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